Climate Anxiety? Inject A Note of Grounded Optimism

David Montgomery is a professor of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington. He received his B.S. in geology at Stanford University (1984) and his Ph.D. in geomorphology from UC Berkeley (1991). Montgomery studies the evolution of topography and the influence of geomorphological processes on ecological systems and human societies. He is the author …

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What Can Young People Do?: Collective Action and People-Powered Politics

Hahrie Han is the Inaugural Director of the SNF Agora Institute, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Professor of Political Science, and Faculty Director of the P3 Research Lab at Johns Hopkins University.  Her award-winning work has been published in the American Political Science Review,  American Sociological Review,  American Journal of Sociology, Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), …

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How to Apply Your Degree in Sociology to Any Career 

Karen Sternheimer teaches in the sociology department at the University of Southern California. Her research focuses primarily on moral panics, youth, and popular culture, and she is editor of the Everyday Sociology Reader (W. W. Norton, 2020). Her commentary has been published in the Los Angeles Times, Newsday, and the San Jose Mercury News. This article was originally posted …

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Arguing with American History 

Jill Lepore is the David Woods Kemper ’41 Professor of American History at Harvard University, where she teaches classes in evidence, historical methods, the humanities, creative writing, and American history. She is the author of many books, including the best-selling These Truths, which she has expanded into a two-volume textbook edition (publishing December 2022). She …

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On Not Returning to School After Thirty-Five Years in the Classroom: What Did the Teacher Learn After All That Time in the Classroom?

Jim Burke, a former English teacher at Middle College at the College of San Mateo, taught for over thirty-five years, and has written more than twenty-five books about teaching and literacy. He has received numerous awards, including the Exemplary Leadership Award from the National Council of Teachers of English and the Distinguished Service Award from …

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Bringing a Deeper Engagement with Race to the Study of American Politics

Megan Ming Francis is the G. Alan and Barbara Delsman Associate Professor of Political Science and an associate professor of law, societies, and justice at the University of Washington. During the 2021–22 academic year, she is also a Senior Democracy Fellow at the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation and a Racial Justice Fellow …

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Seeing the Big Picture of Climate Emergency on Earth Day

De-nin D. Lee is an Associate Professor of Art History in the department of visual & media arts at Emerson College in Boston. She is a co-author of Thames & Hudson’s art history survey text, The History of Art: A Global View, and the forthcoming Asian art history text, The History of Asian Art: A Global View. …

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Open Science Is Science Technology

Elliot T. Berkman is professor of psychology at the University of Oregon. His Social and Affective Neuroscience Lab researches the motivational and cognitive factors that contribute to success and failure of real-world goals, as well as the neural systems that support goal pursuit. He actively communicates the societal impact of psychological research on Psychology Today’s …

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Virtual Field Trips—What I’m Taking Forward

Daniel J. Sherman is the Luce-Funded Professor of Environmental Policy and Decision Making and Director of the Sound Policy Institute at the University of Puget Sound. He studies the roles individuals and groups play in environmental politics, policy, and sustainability. In addition to his undergraduate text, Environmental Science and Sustainability, Sherman published Not Here, Not …

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What’s in a Story? Using Student Narratives to Enhance Your Writing and Teaching

Bruce Punches has been teaching interpersonal and public communication at Kalamazoo Valley Community College for many years. He is also a licensed psychotherapist in private practice, specializing in marriage and family therapy. As I strolled to class one day, a former student, Cliff, yelled out my name in the busy hallway. With a big grin, …

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