Bringing a Deeper Engagement with Race to the Study of American Politics

Megan Ming Francis is the G. Alan and Barbara Delsman Associate Professor of Political Science and an associate professor of law, societies, and justice at the University of Washington. During the 2021–22 academic year, she is also a Senior Democracy Fellow at the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation and a Racial Justice Fellow …

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Seeing the Big Picture of Climate Emergency on Earth Day

De-nin D. Lee is an Associate Professor of Art History in the department of visual & media arts at Emerson College in Boston. She is a co-author of Thames & Hudson’s art history survey text, The History of Art: A Global View, and the forthcoming Asian art history text, The History of Asian Art: A Global View. …

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Open Science Is Science Technology

Elliot T. Berkman is professor of psychology at the University of Oregon. His Social and Affective Neuroscience Lab researches the motivational and cognitive factors that contribute to success and failure of real-world goals, as well as the neural systems that support goal pursuit. He actively communicates the societal impact of psychological research on Psychology Today’s …

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Virtual Field Trips—What I’m Taking Forward

Daniel J. Sherman is the Luce-Funded Professor of Environmental Policy and Decision Making and Director of the Sound Policy Institute at the University of Puget Sound. He studies the roles individuals and groups play in environmental politics, policy, and sustainability. In addition to his undergraduate text, Environmental Science and Sustainability, Sherman published Not Here, Not …

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What’s in a Story? Using Student Narratives to Enhance Your Writing and Teaching

Bruce Punches has been teaching interpersonal and public communication at Kalamazoo Valley Community College for many years. He is also a licensed psychotherapist in private practice, specializing in marriage and family therapy. As I strolled to class one day, a former student, Cliff, yelled out my name in the busy hallway. With a big grin, …

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Transforming Assessment to Address Anxiety in The Language Classroom

Gillian Lord (University of Florida) and Amy Rossomondo (University of Kansas), coauthors of Contraseña: Your Password to Foundational Spanish, share how they developed materials to connect on a new level with students and to help them overcome language learning anxiety.   Our own involvement in teaching Spanish, and teaching others how to teach Spanish, led …

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Creating a More Inclusive Music Theory Repertoire: What We Learned

Betsy Marvin (Eastman School of Music) and Jane Clendinning (Florida State University College of Music) are coauthors of The Musician's Guide to Theory and Analysis. In their classrooms they strive to create a diverse music theory curriculum by including pieces by women and people of color. Here they describe the process of incorporating diverse pieces …

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Teaching Writing in an Age of Misinformation: Q&A with Andrea Lunsford

Andrea Lunsford is emerita professor of English at Stanford University. Her scholarly interests include contemporary rhetorical theory, women and the history of rhetoric, collaboration, style, and technologies of writing. She is the author of Let’s Talk, a new brief composition rhetoric that focuses on listening and civility, in addition to covering the essentials for any …

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Teaching the Fault Lines in a Divided America

Kevin M. Kruse and Julian E. Zelizer, the authors of Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974, are award-winning scholars of twentieth-century American political history. Fault Lines grew out of the hugely popular course that they cocreated at Princeton University, The United States Since 1974. Julian ZelizerPhoto by Meg Jacobs The 2020 election has been …

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What Cognitive Science Can Tell Us about Learning Logic

Debby Hutchins, new coauthor on The Art of Reasoning, discusses how her experiences in the classroom and studying cognitive science informed how she approached working on an introductory logic book “I get the rules, but where do I start?” As a graduate student working the logic help desk at Texas A&M, I came to expect this …

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