Being Human: Lessons and Reminders during a Global Pandemic

Dr. Michael Ramirez is an associate professor of Sociology at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. He teaches courses on gender, work, aging and the life course, and film. Dr. Michael Ramirez, associate professor of Sociology at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi As a sociologist, I am attentive to how nearly every dimension of social life is shaped …

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What I Learned as I Implemented Antiracist and Decolonizing Practices in My Anthropology Course

Liz Soluri is a biological anthropology professor at Cabrillo College and coauthor of Laboratory Manual and Workbook for Biological Anthropology, 2e. She is especially interested in pedagogy and issues of student learning, and her ongoing research focuses on redesigning, implementing, and evaluating effective teaching methods for undergraduate anthropology courses, particularly biological anthropology. In this blog …

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How I Abandoned Summative Assessments and Learned to Love Adaptive Quizzing

Megan McNamara is a sociology instructor at UC Santa Cruz, Foothill College, and West Valley College. You can learn more about her experience using InQuizitive in this video. As a sociologist who consciously chose a career in teaching, I spend a lot of time thinking about how to do my job effectively. Like most of …

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Evaluating Scientific Claims during a Pandemic and Infodemic

Megan Scudellari is a science journalist and a coauthor of Biology Now, Third Edition. In 2013, Megan was awarded the prestigious Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award in recognition of outstanding reporting and writing in science. Her work has appeared in publications such as Nature, The Boston Globe, and The Scientist. Did you know driving tractors or drinking vodka can fight COVID-19? True …

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Calm and Compassionate Online Teaching: Q&A with Shelley Rodrigo

Rochelle (Shelley) Rodrigo has been teaching online for more than 20 years. She has also developed and administered an online writing program and supported instructors as an instructional technologist. Shelley is the interim director of the writing program; associate professor in the rhetoric, composition, and the teaching of English (RCTE); and associate writing specialist (continuing …

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Having “The Talk” with Your Students about Implicit Racism

Toni Schmader holds the Canada research chair in social psychology at the University of British Columbia. She received her PhD in social psychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and was previously a faculty member at the University of Arizona. She is the director of UBC’s Social Identity Laboratory and of a Canada-wide research …

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Prioritizing Well-Being as We Return to the Classroom

Crystal Carlson (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) is an assistant professor of psychology at St. Mary’s University of Minnesota. Crystal is an educational psychologist, dedicated to the scholarship of teaching and learning. She is particularly sensitive to the interplay of student well-being and student success. Her research examines how to support the diverse needs of …

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Cut through the Noise to Understand How Politics Really Works

American Politics Today authors David Canon and Bill Bianco discuss how they get their students to look beyond the noisy headlines and focus on how American Government is supposed to function. One of our goals as authors and teachers is to make students more engaged citizens. While it could be debated what this means and looks like …

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Orchestrating Active Learning in a Less-than-Ideal Environment

Stacy Palen is an award-winning professor in the physics department and director of the Ott Planetarium at Weber State University. Dr. Palen is passionate about teaching astronomy, and presents tips on creating an active learning environment below. image credit: Zac Williams Somehow or other, classroom architects in the 1960s, 1970s, and as far along as …

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