Improve Student Engagement by Ditching Classroom Traditions

M. Chad Smith works as science coordinator and biology professor for Beaufort County Community College (BCCC) in North Carolina. He also teaches biology and environmental science courses as online adjunct faculty for Shaw University and Miller-Motte College. He discusses how he keeps his nonmajor biology students engaged by incorporating active learning in his classroom. One …

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Reading Is Fundamental: Using “Entrance Tickets” to Aid Student Learning

Dr. Janis Prince is an associate professor of sociology and chair of the Department of Social Sciences at Saint Leo University. She has taught at least 16 unique sociology classes, including the sociology of deviance, gender, race, medical sociology, along with quantitative and qualitative methods. In this blog post, she outlines her unique “Entrance Ticket” …

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Using Role Playing to Keep Students Engaged

As courses have moved swiftly online, many faculty wonder about various ways to keep their students engaged remotely. We’ve invited Amy Curry, chair of history at Lone Star College, Montgomery, to share her experiences with using a role-playing pedagogy, Reacting to the Past, in her history survey courses. Image Credit: Nikky Lawell You’ve been using …

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Creating Positive Dual Enrollment Experiences: Six Tips for College and High School Teachers

Deborah Bertsch is professor of English at Columbus State Community College (Ohio), where she teaches first-year composition and helps coordinate the English department’s dual enrollment program. Deborah is coauthor of A Guide to Teaching the Norton Field Guides to Writing, Fifth Edition. Photo by Olivia Harris  Dual enrollment. Concurrent enrollment. Dual Credit. Postsecondary Enrollment Options. …

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Using Videogames to Engage Students in Astronomy Lab

Nicole Gugliucci, assistant professor of astronomy at Saint Anselm College, shares her experience incorporating At Play in the Cosmos: The Videogame into her classroom. I’m not at all what you would call a gamer. The most frequently used app on my phone is probably the one with crossword puzzles. Like a lot of millennials, when I was a kid I dabbled in …

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Being Human: Lessons and Reminders during a Global Pandemic

Dr. Michael Ramirez is an associate professor of Sociology at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. He teaches courses on gender, work, aging and the life course, and film. Dr. Michael Ramirez, associate professor of Sociology at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi As a sociologist, I am attentive to how nearly every dimension of social life is shaped …

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What I Learned as I Implemented Antiracist and Decolonizing Practices in My Anthropology Course

Liz Soluri is a biological anthropology professor at Cabrillo College and coauthor of Laboratory Manual and Workbook for Biological Anthropology, 2e. She is especially interested in pedagogy and issues of student learning, and her ongoing research focuses on redesigning, implementing, and evaluating effective teaching methods for undergraduate anthropology courses, particularly biological anthropology. In this blog …

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How I Abandoned Summative Assessments and Learned to Love Adaptive Quizzing

Megan McNamara is a sociology instructor at UC Santa Cruz, Foothill College, and West Valley College. You can learn more about her experience using InQuizitive in this video. As a sociologist who consciously chose a career in teaching, I spend a lot of time thinking about how to do my job effectively. Like most of …

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Evaluating Scientific Claims during a Pandemic and Infodemic

Megan Scudellari is a science journalist and a coauthor of Biology Now, Third Edition. In 2013, Megan was awarded the prestigious Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award in recognition of outstanding reporting and writing in science. Her work has appeared in publications such as Nature, The Boston Globe, and The Scientist. Did you know driving tractors or drinking vodka can fight COVID-19? True …

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Calm and Compassionate Online Teaching: Q&A with Shelley Rodrigo

Rochelle (Shelley) Rodrigo has been teaching online for more than 20 years. She has also developed and administered an online writing program and supported instructors as an instructional technologist. Shelley is the interim director of the writing program; associate professor in the rhetoric, composition, and the teaching of English (RCTE); and associate writing specialist (continuing …

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