Using Role Playing to Keep Students Engaged

As courses have moved swiftly online, many faculty wonder about various ways to keep their students engaged remotely. We’ve invited Amy Curry, chair of history at Lone Star College, Montgomery, to share her experiences with using a role-playing pedagogy, Reacting to the Past, in her history survey courses. Image Credit: Nikky Lawell You’ve been using …

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Teaching Writing in an Age of Misinformation: Q&A with Andrea Lunsford

Andrea Lunsford is emerita professor of English at Stanford University. Her scholarly interests include contemporary rhetorical theory, women and the history of rhetoric, collaboration, style, and technologies of writing. She is the author of Let’s Talk, a new brief composition rhetoric that focuses on listening and civility, in addition to covering the essentials for any …

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Creating Positive Dual Enrollment Experiences: Six Tips for College and High School Teachers

Deborah Bertsch is professor of English at Columbus State Community College (Ohio), where she teaches first-year composition and helps coordinate the English department’s dual enrollment program. Deborah is coauthor of A Guide to Teaching the Norton Field Guides to Writing, Fifth Edition. Photo by Olivia Harris  Dual enrollment. Concurrent enrollment. Dual Credit. Postsecondary Enrollment Options. …

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Teaching the Fault Lines in a Divided America

Kevin M. Kruse and Julian E. Zelizer, the authors of Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974, are award-winning scholars of twentieth-century American political history. Fault Lines grew out of the hugely popular course that they cocreated at Princeton University, The United States Since 1974. Julian ZelizerPhoto by Meg Jacobs The 2020 election has been …

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Behind the Scenes: How Do You Make a Map?

Acclaimed historian John McNeill and Charlotte Miller, a cartographic specialist, discuss how they collaborated to create over 150 original maps for McNeill’s new world history survey text: The Webs of Humankind: A World History. John, in your eyes, what makes a good map? What were your goals for the maps in your new textbook? John …

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What Cognitive Science Can Tell Us about Learning Logic

Debby Hutchins, new coauthor on The Art of Reasoning, discusses how her experiences in the classroom and studying cognitive science informed how she approached working on an introductory logic book “I get the rules, but where do I start?” As a graduate student working the logic help desk at Texas A&M, I came to expect this …

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Using Videogames to Engage Students in Astronomy Lab

Nicole Gugliucci, assistant professor of astronomy at Saint Anselm College, shares her experience incorporating At Play in the Cosmos: The Videogame into her classroom. I’m not at all what you would call a gamer. The most frequently used app on my phone is probably the one with crossword puzzles. Like a lot of millennials, when I was a kid I dabbled in …

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Being Human: Lessons and Reminders during a Global Pandemic

Dr. Michael Ramirez is an associate professor of Sociology at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. He teaches courses on gender, work, aging and the life course, and film. Dr. Michael Ramirez, associate professor of Sociology at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi As a sociologist, I am attentive to how nearly every dimension of social life is shaped …

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What I Learned as I Implemented Antiracist and Decolonizing Practices in My Anthropology Course

Liz Soluri is a biological anthropology professor at Cabrillo College and coauthor of Laboratory Manual and Workbook for Biological Anthropology, 2e. She is especially interested in pedagogy and issues of student learning, and her ongoing research focuses on redesigning, implementing, and evaluating effective teaching methods for undergraduate anthropology courses, particularly biological anthropology. In this blog …

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Decanonizing the Introduction to Sociology Text

Lisa Wade, PhD, is a Visiting Scholar at Tulane University, formally joining the faculty in 2021. An accomplished scholar, award-winning teacher, and public sociologist, she has become well known for delivering conversational yet compelling translations of sociological theory and research. She’s the author of the best-selling textbook Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions and American Hookup, the definitive account of …

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