Being Human: Lessons and Reminders during a Global Pandemic

Dr. Michael Ramirez is an associate professor of Sociology at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. He teaches courses on gender, work, aging and the life course, and film. Dr. Michael Ramirez, associate professor of Sociology at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi As a sociologist, I am attentive to how nearly every dimension of social life is shaped …

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What I Learned as I Implemented Antiracist and Decolonizing Practices in My Anthropology Course

Liz Soluri is a biological anthropology professor at Cabrillo College and coauthor of Laboratory Manual and Workbook for Biological Anthropology, 2e. She is especially interested in pedagogy and issues of student learning, and her ongoing research focuses on redesigning, implementing, and evaluating effective teaching methods for undergraduate anthropology courses, particularly biological anthropology. In this blog …

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Decanonizing the Introduction to Sociology Text

Lisa Wade, PhD, is a Visiting Scholar at Tulane University, formally joining the faculty in 2021. An accomplished scholar, award-winning teacher, and public sociologist, she has become well known for delivering conversational yet compelling translations of sociological theory and research. She’s the author of the best-selling textbook Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions and American Hookup, the definitive account of …

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How I Abandoned Summative Assessments and Learned to Love Adaptive Quizzing

Megan McNamara is a sociology instructor at UC Santa Cruz, Foothill College, and West Valley College. You can learn more about her experience using InQuizitive in this video. As a sociologist who consciously chose a career in teaching, I spend a lot of time thinking about how to do my job effectively. Like most of …

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A Social Constructionist Approach to Current Events: Q&A with Joel Best

Joel Best, the author of Social Problems, discusses how taking a social constructionist approach to the social problems course keeps it timely—even during a pandemic.   Photo Credit: Kathy Atkinson Norton Sociology: We’re having this conversation as the fall semester is beginning. It’s been a crazy year, not just with many college classes being forced …

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Digitizing The Problems Book: An Interview with Tim Hunt and John Wilson

What happens when you take a pen-and-paper assignment and translate it to an online environment? What do you and your students give up and what do you gain? Norton Biology recently sat down with Tim Hunt and John Wilson, authors of the beloved Problems Book that accompanies Molecular Biology of the Cell, Sixth Edition, which …

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Evaluating Scientific Claims during a Pandemic and Infodemic

Megan Scudellari is a science journalist and a coauthor of Biology Now, Third Edition. In 2013, Megan was awarded the prestigious Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award in recognition of outstanding reporting and writing in science. Her work has appeared in publications such as Nature, The Boston Globe, and The Scientist. Did you know driving tractors or drinking vodka can fight COVID-19? True …

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Calm and Compassionate Online Teaching: Q&A with Shelley Rodrigo

Rochelle (Shelley) Rodrigo has been teaching online for more than 20 years. She has also developed and administered an online writing program and supported instructors as an instructional technologist. Shelley is the interim director of the writing program; associate professor in the rhetoric, composition, and the teaching of English (RCTE); and associate writing specialist (continuing …

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Having “The Talk” with Your Students about Implicit Racism

Toni Schmader holds the Canada research chair in social psychology at the University of British Columbia. She received her PhD in social psychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and was previously a faculty member at the University of Arizona. She is the director of UBC’s Social Identity Laboratory and of a Canada-wide research …

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Prioritizing Well-Being as We Return to the Classroom

Crystal Carlson (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) is an assistant professor of psychology at St. Mary’s University of Minnesota. Crystal is an educational psychologist, dedicated to the scholarship of teaching and learning. She is particularly sensitive to the interplay of student well-being and student success. Her research examines how to support the diverse needs of …

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