Using Role Playing to Keep Students Engaged

As courses have moved swiftly online, many faculty wonder about various ways to keep their students engaged remotely. We’ve invited Amy Curry, chair of history at Lone Star College, Montgomery, to share her experiences with using a role-playing pedagogy, Reacting to the Past, in her history survey courses. Image Credit: Nikky Lawell You’ve been using …

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Teaching the Fault Lines in a Divided America

Kevin M. Kruse and Julian E. Zelizer, the authors of Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974, are award-winning scholars of twentieth-century American political history. Fault Lines grew out of the hugely popular course that they cocreated at Princeton University, The United States Since 1974. Julian ZelizerPhoto by Meg Jacobs The 2020 election has been …

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Developing the History Careers Poster

Last summer Norton’s team of history editors and specialists were thinking through a concern we frequently hear about on campus: students (and sometimes parents) wonder whether what they’ll learn as history majors can apply to future career pursuits. We decided to answer this evergreen question—“What Can I Do with a History Degree?”—with a poster our …

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Is “Western Civ” Still Relevant in Our Global Era? A Q&A with Author Carol Symes

Carol Symes, co-author of Western Civilizations, talks about recent shifts in teaching history survey courses, and how Whiggish ideas of European history have been co-opted by white nationalist groups. She gives a more expansive view of Western Civilizations, and discusses how her research informs her global approach to the textbook. You regularly teach a survey of …

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